Tips for Ending the Physician-Patient Relationship With Problem Patients

One question I get from time to time is how a doctor may discharge “problem patients” and end the physician-patient relationship. Doctors who terminate the relationship improperly can face disciplinary charges for patient abandonment or worse. Medical Board complaints for patient abandonment are generally the result of poor communication and typically are the product of a doctor moving to a new practice group; the closing of a medical practice; or a physician moving to a new city. I’ll deal with closing and departing from a medical practice in another post. The issue today is the “problem patient” — one who is disruptive, non-compliant, delinquent or simply has a personality clash with the physician or staff. Discharging these patients should be done with care.

The physician-patient relationship is not a life-long commitment for either the doctor or the patient. With the exception of certain requirements of EMTALA (the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act of 1986), physicians are not obligated to accept every patient who seeks his or her services. Once the doctor-patient relationship is established, however, a doctor must follow certain guidelines when discharging a patient to avoid abandoning the patient. Colorado Medical Board policy 40-02 sets out the procedural guidelines for discharging a patient. The Medical Board recommends that:

  • Any discharge be in writing and sent to the patient via certified mail;
  • In the discharge letter, the doctor agrees to provide 15-30 days of provisions coverage while the patient finds a new doctor;
  • The physician provide information for referral to new physicians, if possible; and
  • The letter notify the patient that the patients’ records will be sent to the new physician upon receipt of a written authorization from the patient.

Keeping in mind that problem patients are being discharged for a reason, care should be taken to make sure that a physician minimizes the risk of being charged with abandonment or worse by virtue of the discharge. Even where procedural guidelines are followed, physicians must take care that all discharges are for non-discriminatory reasons, not in violation of anti-discrimination laws such as the Americans with Disabilities Act, and do not jeopardize the welfare of the patient. Thus, a discharge letter should also explain the reasons for discharge in clear and concise language, taking care to spell out the non-discriminatory basis for ending the relationship. A properly prepared discharge letter can eliminate many headaches for the doctor down the road.

Copyright Miller | Kabler, P.C., Attorneys-at-Law